Tuesday, May 11, 2010

On Being Pure Of Heart

About a week and a half before the election, I said I'd vote Lib Dem if I were voting where I grew up, in Battersea, and not where I live now. Martin Linton, the Labour incumbent, had been deeply unsatisfactory as an MP: a pretty craven piece of 1997 New Labour lobby fodder who'd not even had the decency to buy any real influence in exchange for more or less absolute loyalty. He was also 9th on the Tory hitlist, having scraped through two recounts last time, and was presumably looking enviously at a snowball's chances in hell. I know people who did vote Lib Dem in Battersea, although I'm fairly sure that had it come to it, I wouldn't have done. Although obviously I don't know all of them, I wonder how the 7,000-odd of them now feel about having unseated a Labour MP. Not only have they effectively put a Tory in, but they did so by voting in favour of a candidate who would have ended up being Tory lobby fodder anyway. Having voted in favour of more or less everything Blair and Brown have done is not great; voting in favour of everything David Cameron will do is going to be worse. Of course our voting system's not fair. Behaving as if it were will not make it so. Lib Dems may resist being described as yellow Tories, but if it walks the walk... I suspect that they are now about to be royally screwed by everyone, and I can't say that I'm particularly distressed by this.

4 comments:

Eleanor said...

Who else do you know in Battersea? I warned you and best beloved both and now look what's happened. Also the Lib Dem PPC was entirely unfit for government and would have been awful regardless of any coalition.

Rob Jubb said...

Myhill lives up by the old power station. I'd come round to the view that all votes in favour of Labour were a good thing by the time of the election; I would have voted for Linton.

Anonymous said...

'Having voted in favour of more or less everything Blair and Brown have done is not great; voting in favour of everything David Cameron will do is going to be worse.'

Really? It strikes me as desperately epistemically immodest to make this kind of pronouncement.

Rob Jubb said...

Given that you're not prepared to own your words, it strikes me as just straightforwardly foolish to take anything you say as anything seriously.